Home Lifestyle Fashion students recycle discarded for sale Bindaring

Fashion students recycle discarded for sale Bindaring

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The clothing sale, which began in Clermont’s garage nearly 60 years ago, will return to the Showground this weekend to continue promoting the previously beloved fashion.

The Bindaring Clothing Sale, which will take place this Sunday, May 15, is a one-day event where fashion fans can purchase their favorite clothes that have been reused, recycled or recycled.

In an additional effort to promote the beauty of recycled products, eight graduate students from the Southern Metropolitan Diocese of Bentley TAFE will showcase their works made from at least 80 percent of discarded garments.

The task was to creatively approach the “disposable” fashion, when clothes are considered disposable after a series of wear, students of applied clothing design chose discarded items of clothing and fabrics and reassigned them to the topic of “mapping”.

Camera iconFashion student Catherine Puglia with her work A Culture Embraced. Ross Swanboro Credit: Ross Swanboro/Western Australian

A fashion student, 17-year-old Catherine Pulela, who lives in City Beach, drew inspiration from her family’s migration from Sicily to Australia for her “A Culture Embraced” outfit.

She said that when she grew up, family was always “the most important” thing in her life.

“I remember last year my Italian teacher Enzo telling me, ‘Catherine, you’re who you are, thanks to your Italian culture,'” Ms. Pulela said.

“So in my clothes I used things, including recycled beads and threads, to help create the prickly pear, which is synonymous with Sicily, and Trinacre, a face on the Sicilian flag that symbolizes the fertility and prosperity of the region that can be seen from above.

“To follow the theme of mapping, I used real maps of the old Clermont College of Education from 1969 for the sleeves on which I embroidered the curls.”

Fashion student Gigi Raphael with her work Shipwreck.  Ross Swanboro
Camera iconFashion student Gigi Raphael with her work Shipwreck. Ross Swanboro Credit: Ross Swanboro/Western Australian

Inspired by the “beauty” of sailing ships of the 1600s, fashion student Gigi Raphael used a variety of techniques and recycled items for her “Crashed Victim” clothing.

“I’ve always been interested in what happened to these ships that didn’t make it to their destination, and how nature would take its course on them if they were shipwrecked,” Ms. Raphael said.

“The sleeves are the sails of these ships, on which I hand-painted coffee, and then for the skirt-twisted I used a pillow stuffing glued into balls to reflect corals or some other element of the sea.

“I wanted the clothes to look textual, something that could be touched and seen up close, that it was beautiful, but also a perishable object.

“I’m so proud of what I’ve achieved with this, and it’s definitely worth smelling like coffee for a few days.”

Female student with a fashion degree Zoe Walker with her work Cyclone Washup.  Ross Swanboro
Camera iconFemale student with a fashion degree Zoe Walker with her work Cyclone Washup. Ross Swanboro Credit: Ross Swanboro/Western Australian

All proceeds went to the Australian Red Cross, to date the Bindaring clothing sale has raised more than $ 2.4 million, which has helped the Public Services Charitable Foundation in Western Australia.

The event helps to ensure that the eight tons of donations received annually do not end up in landfills.

Both Ms. Puella and Ms. Raphael shared the importance of selling Bindaring clothing, agreeing that the event encouraged people to invest in recycled clothing.

“We live in such a fast-paced society, and it’s getting faster; it’s about encouraging people to choose ap-shops and vintage fashion options instead of choosing a fast route, ”Ms. Rafael said.

“Just like our products for Bindaring, the clothing op shop has such a unique history; especially especially to look at a thing and think, “where did it come from, who wore it to me?”.

Ms. Pulela added: “Bindaring’s goal is to really encourage originality and creativity in recycled clothing, so I hope that our clothing can give some inspiration and show people that they don’t need to buy fast fashion items.”

Marie-Claire Foley, a student with a fashion degree, drew inspiration from the mapped outlines of the earth and the landscape painting by artist Maria Kemp for her clothes
Camera iconMarie-Claire Foley, a student with a fashion degree, drew inspiration from the mapped outlines of the earth and the landscape painting by artist Maria Kemp for her clothes “Broken Earth”. Ross Swanboro Credit: Ross Swanboro/Western Australian

Marie Claire Foley and Zoe Walker, fashion graduates, will also show their clothes at the event.

While Ms. Foley’s work “Fractured Earth” is inspired by mapped contours of the earth using a corded pipe through fabric that symbolizes earthquake-like splits, Mrs. Walker’s “Cyclone Wash Up” clothing includes frayed scaffolding and embroidered threads that symbolize the sieve. which are weather fronts moving on the ground.

The Bindaring Clothing Sale will take place at the Robinson Pavilion at the Claremont Showground from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

https://www.perthnow.com.au/community-news/western-suburbs-weekly/fashion-students-upcycle-the-discarded-for-bindaring-sale-c-6652873

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