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Liz Trass Announces Plan to Unilaterally Waive Part of Northern Ireland Protocol – UK Politics Live | Politics

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Dublin says “violation of international law is not the answer” if Trass is going to announce a plan for the Northern Ireland Protocol

Good morning Liz Trass, the foreign minister, would later make a statement to lawmakers about the government’s plans to pass legislation that would allow some parts of the law to be ignored. Northern Ireland Protocol – an agreement signed with the EU to control certain goods coming from the UK to Northern Ireland to ensure that Northern Ireland can remain in the EU’s single market and to prevent checks at its border with Ireland.

The proposal is potentially inflammatory – because it implies the UK’s unilateral rejection of an agreement it reached with the EU less than three years ago.

But there are indications that this may not be as provocative as originally thought. Trace is not going to publish a real bill today, and government sources indicate that MPs will not start discussing the legislation earlier this year. This, of course, raises suspicions in this No. 10 is not particularly serious about this anyway, and that it could be nothing more than an empty threat. In our night story Rowena Mason, Lisa O’Carroll and Rory Carroll write:

In recent days № 10 is not as eager as Trass, the legislative option of undermining the protocol.

One diplomatic source said that one of the prime minister’s top aides privately told people that the government was very committed to the talks and no decision was made on further implementation of the legislation.

The full story is here.

In light of these briefings, it will be interesting to see what tone the track will take. On the weekend carried the Sunday Times report on Tim Shipman suggesting that some of Boris Johnson’s associates view her as a “fool.” Shipman wrote:

In some parts of number 10 there is a badly hidden rage that Trass and David Canzini, the deputy chief of staff, so privately appreciate the confrontation with the EU. One senior official said: “The purpose of the exercises with some people seems to be a fight. The purpose of the exercise for the Prime Minister is to restore democratic processes in Northern Ireland. We want weapons on the table, we don’t want to use them. It’s like nuclear deterrence. The prime minister does not want to use nuclear weapons, no matter what a fool calls him. “

The track informed Simon Cowney, her Irish opposite number was in the plan last night, and this morning he says he told her that a “violation of international law” is not the solution.

I talked to last night @trussliz and look forward to a personal meeting in Italy later this week. I have made it clear that a violation of international law is not the answer to the protocol. EU / UK negotiating teams have not met since February. Time to get back to the table. @dfatirl

– Simon Cowney (@simoncoveney) May 17, 2022

Here is the agenda for the day.

Morning: Boris Johnson heads the cabinet.

11.30 am: Chancellor Rishi Sunak answers questions in the House of Commons.

11.30 am: Downing Street is holding a briefing in the lobby.

After 12.30: Liz Trass, the foreign minister, makes a statement on proposed legislation that allows the government to ignore parts of the Northern Ireland Protocol.

After 13.30: Deputies resume debate on the Queen’s speech. At 19.00 there will be a vote on the Labor Amendment, which provides for a tax on energy companies.

14.30: Alistair Burt, a former foreign minister, testifies in the Foreign Affairs Committee on how the government reacts when people like Nazanin Zagari-Ratcliffe become hostages of foreign states; at 3.30pm Jeremy Hunt, a former foreign minister, will testify.

15:00: Greg Dyke, former BBC Director-General, and Andrew Neal, broadcaster, give testimony to the Lords Committee on the future of BBC funding.

I try to follow the comments below the line (BTL), but it is impossible to read all of them. If you have a direct question, include “Andrew” somewhere in it, and I’ll most likely find it. I try to answer questions, and if they are of common interest, I will post the question and answer over the line (ATL), although I can’t promise to do it for everyone.

If you want to get my attention quickly, then it’s probably best to take advantage of Twitter. I’m on @AndrewSparrow.

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The head of the Bank of England went too far, warning of “apocalyptic” food prices, the minister said

Brandon Lewis, Northern Ireland secretary, conducted a morning interview this morning on behalf of the government. He mostly talked about the protocol, but he also expressed what sounded like a mild rebuke to the head of the Bank of England Andrew Bailey for his comments to MPs yesterday. Lewis meant that Bailey had gone too far.

Like my colleague Larry Elliott Bailey was reportedly accused of war Ukraine for the highest inflation in Britain over the past three decades and warned that “apocalyptic” food prices caused by Russia’s invasion could have a catastrophic impact on the world’s poor.

Asked about the comments, and especially about Bailey’s use of the word “apocalyptic,” Lewis told the BBC:

I was surprised to see this particular turn of the phrase, I have to say.

But the Bank of England is independent, they will have their own view of their assessment, their economic view of where things are and where they are going.

Lewis continued:

We recognize … and as an MP from the constituency I see the problems that some of my constituents are facing, that we are all facing.

In my part of the world [Lewis represents Great Yarmouth in Norfolk] we all – most people – are on oil heating and you see that price change that has a big impact on people.

That’s why I think it’s important as a government that we include in the support packages we’ve provided, and as the Chancellor said, that’s something we’re going to look at because of global pressure, as the Bank of England chief said yesterday that we observe in the economy around the world.

Dublin says “violation of international law is not the answer” if Trass is going to announce a plan for the Northern Ireland Protocol

Good morning Liz Trass, the foreign minister, would later make a statement to lawmakers about the government’s plans to pass legislation that would allow some parts of the law to be ignored. Northern Ireland protocol – an agreement signed with the EU to control certain goods from the UK to Northern Ireland to ensure that Northern Ireland can remain in the EU’s single market and to prevent checks at its border with Ireland.

The proposal is potentially inflammatory – because it implies the UK’s unilateral rejection of an agreement it reached with the EU less than three years ago.

But there are indications that this may not be as provocative as originally thought. Trace is not going to publish a real bill today, and government sources indicate that MPs will not start discussing the legislation earlier this year. This, of course, raises suspicions in this No. 10 is not particularly serious about this anyway, and that it could be nothing more than an empty threat. In our night story Rowena Mason, Lisa O’Carroll and Rory Carroll write:

In recent days № 10 is not as eager as Trass, the legislative option of undermining the protocol.

One diplomatic source said that one of the prime minister’s top aides privately told people that the government was very committed to the talks and no decision was made on further implementation of the legislation.

The full story is here.

In light of these briefings, it will be interesting to see what tone the track will take. On the weekend carried the Sunday Times report on Tim Shipman suggesting that some of Boris Johnson’s associates view her as a “fool.” Shipman wrote:

In some parts of number 10 there is a badly hidden rage that Trass and David Canzini, the deputy chief of staff, so privately appreciate the confrontation with the EU. One senior official said: “The purpose of the exercises with some people seems to be a fight. The purpose of the exercise for the Prime Minister is to restore democratic processes in Northern Ireland. We want weapons on the table, we don’t want to use them. It’s like nuclear deterrence. The prime minister does not want to use nuclear weapons, no matter what a fool calls him. “

The track informed Simon Cowney, her Irish opposite number was in the plan last night, and this morning he says he told her that a “violation of international law” is not the solution.

I talked to last night @trussliz and look forward to a personal meeting in Italy later this week. I have made it clear that a violation of international law is not the answer to the protocol. EU / UK negotiating teams have not met since February. Time to get back to the table. @dfatirl

– Simon Cowney (@simoncoveney) May 17, 2022

Here is the agenda for the day.

Morning: Boris Johnson heads the cabinet.

11.30 am: Chancellor Rishi Sunak answers questions in the House of Commons.

11.30 am: Downing Street is holding a briefing in the lobby.

After 12.30: Liz Trass, the foreign minister, makes a statement on proposed legislation that allows the government to ignore parts of the Northern Ireland Protocol.

After 13.30: Deputies resume debate on the Queen’s speech. At 19.00 there will be a vote on the Labor Amendment, which provides for a tax on energy companies.

14.30: Alistair Bert, a former foreign minister, testifies in the Foreign Affairs Committee on how the government reacts when people like Nazanin Zagari-Ratcliffe are taken hostage by foreign states; at 3.30pm Jeremy Hunt, a former foreign minister, will testify.

15:00: Greg Dyke, former BBC Director-General, and Andrew Neal, broadcaster, give testimony to the Lords Committee on the future of BBC funding.

I try to follow the comments below the line (BTL), but it is impossible to read all of them. If you have a direct question, include “Andrew” somewhere in it, and I’ll most likely find it. I try to answer questions, and if they are of common interest, I will post the question and answer over the line (ATL), although I can’t promise to do it for everyone.

If you want to get my attention quickly, then it’s probably best to take advantage of Twitter. I’m on @AndrewSparrow.

Alternatively, you can email me andrew.sparrow@theguardian.com.

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/live/2022/may/17/northern-ireland-protocol-brexit-liz-truss-boris-johnson-uk-politics-latest

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