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Queen lies in state: Public queue all night on last full day to see coffin – live | Queen Elizabeth II

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How long is the queue?

Currently, the DCMS tracker says people have to wait 13-and-a-half hours in line to pay their respects to the late monarch.

With the layover set to end at 6.30am on Monday morning, it suggests that at some point later in the afternoon – currently around 5pm – authorities will need to start discouraging people from queuing.

DCMS tracker of the queue to see the Queen’s coffin.

Key events

Former Archbishop of York, Lord Sentamu, was interviewed by the BBC this morning on Sunday with Laura Kuensberg. PA Media reports that he told viewers the Queen did not want a “dreary” funeral service, saying:

What you are going to expect is the best of funeral services, the service of the prayer book, the words that inspired Shakespeare.

You will hear this beautiful English language at its best and you will also hear the angelic voices of the Abbey Choir and the Royal Chapel, you will truly hear voices singing the praises of God.

The Queen does not want or desire what you call long, boring services, you will not be bored, but you will be lifted up to glory when you hear the service. People’s hearts and cocks will warm.

Lord John Sentamu speaking at York Cathedral earlier this year. Photo: Danny Lawson/Pennsylvania

If you’ve been planning to do something other than watch tomorrow’s funeral in the UK, your choices may be a bit limited.

PA Media reports that a number of the country’s biggest retailers have said they will close their stores so workers can pay their respects to the Queen, including Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Morrisons, Lidl and Aldi. Marks & Spencer and Primark also said they would close for the day, while cinema chains Cineworld and Odeon announced plans to close their venues.

Tesco says it will open its Express convenience stores from 5 p.m. Asda said it would close its stores for the funeral, but all its supermarkets would open from 5pm and colleagues would work on Monday night to receive double pay.

The Government has issued some advice to members of the public on how they can watch some of the solemn parts of tomorrow’s state funeral. It says:

At 10.44am the Queen’s coffin will be moved from the Palace of Westminster to Westminster Abbey. It is expected that it will receive two thousand guests, which will start at 11.00 [be] after which a nationwide two-minute silence took place at 11:55.

The public procession will begin at 12.15pm when Her Majesty’s coffin will travel from Westminster Abbey to Wellington Arch in London.

The procession will pass along Broad Sanctuary, Parliament Square, Whitehall, Horse Guards Parade, Horse Guards Road, the Mall, Constitution Hill and end at Wellington Arch in London.

There is space for those with accessibility requirements on the Green Park side of the shopping center and on the St James’s Park side. There will be British Sign Language interpreters and a sound system in the Albert Memorial viewing areas.

Away from London, there are many events to celebrate life Queen Elizabeth II happening today.

These include memorial services held at various times in cathedrals in Blackburn, Bradford, Canterbury, Chichester, Durham, Gloucester, Lichfield, Liverpool, Manchester, Norwich, Sheffield and Worcester.

The government website has a list of events that will take place today here.

Peter Stanford, author of How to Read a Graveyard: Journeys in the Company of the Dead, wrote for the Observer today about death rituals and the meaning of mourning. in it, he says:

However much we feel in the prime of life, with full diaries and all the possibilities before us, the ritual of attending a funeral – or watching a funeral on our screens on a day designated for us as a national holiday – is like an unconditional invitation to reflect on our own mortality. as well as the opportunity to openly remember those who have left our lives, to mourn them again. As we watch the Queen’s children and grandchildren struggle to hold back tears, we will remember how we did the same in similar circumstances.

And the sadness of those we loved and whose death leaves an unfilled space in our lives never goes away. We just get used to living with it, learning to shed tears for lost parents, siblings, partners, children, friends in private rather than in public. The Queen’s funeral will raise this curtain for at least a day.

You can read more of Peter Stanford’s article here: Ritual of life – mourning the Queen, we face our own mortality

What is being called a “national moment of reflection” is scheduled for 8pm today in the UK, where people are being urged to hold a minute’s silence. It will follow a pre-recorded televised address by the Queen Consort, as reported by Nadeem Badshah:

The Queen Consort is due to pay a televised tribute to the Queen on Sunday, praising her for doing her own part over the years in the “difficult position” of being a “lone woman” in a male-dominated world.

In pre-recorded words, she will also remember the late monarch’s “beautiful blue eyes” and say: “I will always remember her smile.”

The Queen Consort’s tribute to her mother-in-law will be broadcast shortly before the national moment of silence at 8pm.

Camilla will say: “She has been a part of our lives forever. I am now 75 years old and I don’t remember anyone being there but the Queen. It must have been so hard for her to be a single woman.

“There were no women prime ministers and presidents. She was the only one, so I think she carved out her own role.”

Remembering the late monarch, Camilla added: “She has beautiful blue eyes, when she smiles they light up her whole face. I will always remember her smile. That smile is unforgettable.”

You can read more of Nadeem Badshah’s report here: Camilla will pay tribute to the Queen on TV

As a note, if you missed the news, a route was available during this process that started at Tate Britain and had timed slots for people with access requirements to take part in the national mourning.

It has now been permanently closed, all time slots and wristbands have been allocated, and the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport said:

The available bed queue is full and permanently closed. Wristbands for all time slots are distributed so that as many people as possible can pay their respects. Please do not queue at Tate Britain. Thank you for your understanding.

You can read more about it in Charlie Moloney’s report here: Queen’s coffin available queue permanently closed after reaching “full”

How long is the queue?

Currently, the DCMS tracker says people have to wait 13-and-a-half hours in line to pay their respects to the late monarch.

With the curfew due to end at 6.30am on Monday morning, it suggests that at some point later in the afternoon – currently around 5pm – authorities will need to start stopping people from joining the queue.

DCMS tracker of the queue to see the Queen’s coffin.

Good morning from London. Today is the last full day of lying by the Queen’s coffin before tomorrow’s state funeral.

Heads of state and members of foreign royal families are expected to begin arriving in London for the funeral later.

The king is also due to hold an audience with Liz Truss at Buckingham Palace, while the king and queen will host heads of state and official foreign guests at the palace, in what a royal spokesman described as an “official state event”.

A memorial service will be held in honor of the Queen at the Kelpies Sculptures near Falkirk, Scotland, and members of the public are invited to observe the Queen’s memory with a minute’s silence at 8pm.

We will bring you all the latest developments throughout the day. I’m Martin Belam and you can contact me at martin.belam@theguardian.com

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/live/2022/sep/18/queen-lying-in-state-queue-king-charles-latest-updates-live-news

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